Nigeria needs single policy to address clean cooking challenges, says Eleri

Nigeria needs single policy to address clean cooking challenges, says Eleri

Ewah Eleri is the Executive Director, International Centre for Energy, Environment & Development (ICEED) and top member of the Nigerian Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (NACC), a public private partnership. He spoke to CHINEDUM UWAEGBULAM on efforts to meet Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) and Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCP) commitments. Traditional cooking with firewood and other polluting fuels are claiming lives, destroying the environment and putting a burden on women. Do we have clear-cut policies and strategies for low carbon energy development in Nigeria?According to available statistics from the World Health Organisation (WHO), smoke from the kitchen leads to 95,300 deaths yearly in Nigeria. After malaria and HIV/Aids, indoor air pollution is possibly Nigeria’s third highest killer. For those who survive the smoke there are serious health consequences. Children born to women who are exposed during pregnancy, risk low birth weight, impaired mental abilities and birth defects. In many ways, the lack of access to clean cooking is Nigeria’s silent energy crisis. But the costs are primarily borne by women. In many parts of the country, women and girls are responsible for fetching firewood. This is time that they could go schooling and doing other empowerment opportunities. Besides the drudgery of collecting firewood, women and girls also bear the additional burden of inhaling the deadly smoke. Curiously, issues of clean cooking hardly make it to the priority list of energy policy making. Beyond the health impacts, Nigeria has 3.5 per cent yearly rate of deforestation and loses approximately 350,000 – 400,000 hectares per year. The widespread use of wood for cooking contributes a sizeable share of deforestation, alongside expanding agriculture, bush...
FG moves to develop national policy on clean cooking

FG moves to develop national policy on clean cooking

  In a renewed effort to meet Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) and Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCP) commitments, the Federal Government has established a committee to develop a national policy on clean cooking and meeting universal access. The Federal Ministry of Environment inaugurated the National Clean Cooking Committee under the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Climate Change. The committee comprised of key stakeholders in the public sector, private institutions, development partners and civil society organisations among others. The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Environment, Musa Hassan, represented by Director of Human Resources, Mr. L. T. Adigwe, during his inaugural speech said the committee would tackle some of the complex issues that the clean cooking sector is facing, from the lack of an enabling environment to strengthening supply and demand of clean cooking in the country. According to him “over 75 per cent of Nigeria’s population still rely on solid fuel for their household cooking and heating needs, which poses threat to the health and safety of end-users, mainly women often accompanied by their children.” He attributed the lack of policy coherence and clear institutional leadership as a major barrier to realising the potential of clean cooking in the country. Hassan called for joint and cooperative efforts to tackle the problem of inefficient cooking nationally and globally as no individual organisation can confront the phenomenon alone. He assured that his ministry would continue to collaborate, support and provide the required leadership in ensuring a viable clean cooking sector in Nigeria. Earlier, the Director, Department of Climate Change, Federal Ministry of Environment, Dr. Iniobong Abiola-Awe, said: “Nigeria as a signatory to the United...
Federal Government of Nigeria Inaugurates National Clean Cooking Committee

Federal Government of Nigeria Inaugurates National Clean Cooking Committee

The Federal Ministry of Environment on Friday, May 27, 2022 inaugurated the National Clean Cooking Committee under the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Climate Change. The committee is saddled with the task of developing a national policy on clean cooking and meeting the federal government’s goal of universal access. The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Environment, Engr. Musa Hassan represented by Mr. L. T. Adigwe, Director of Human Resources, Federal Ministry of Environment during his inaugural speech mentioned that the committee is inaugurated to tackle some of the complex issues that the clean cooking sector is facing, from the lack of an enabling environment, to strengthening the supply and demand of clean cooking in Nigeria. According to him “over 75% of Nigeria’s population still rely on solid fuel for their household cooking and heating needs and this poses threat to the health and safety of end-users, mainly women often accompanied by their children”.He attributed the lack of policy coherence and clear institutional leadership as a major barrier to realizing the potentials of clean cooking in Nigeria. He called on joint and cooperative efforts to tackle the problem of inefficient cooking nationally and globally as no individual organisation can confront the phenomenon alone. While inaugurating the committee, he assured that his Ministry will continue to collaborate, support and provide the required leadership role in ensuring a viable clean cooking sector in Nigeria. In her welcome address, the Director of the Department of Climate Change, Federal Ministry of Environment, Dr. Iniobong Abiola-Awe stated that “Nigeria as a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate change (UNFCCC) and the Paris agreement has...
Press Statement-NIGERIA TO DEVELOP CLEAN COOKING POLICY

Press Statement-NIGERIA TO DEVELOP CLEAN COOKING POLICY

The Federal Government of Nigeria is set to develop a clean cooking policy. This was the key message in the just concluded Nigerian Clean Cooking Forum organized by the Nigerian Alliance for Clean Cooking in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Environment and other partners, and with support from Heinrich Boell Stiftung (HBS) and the Nigeria Energy Support Programme (NESP). The two-day event, held on 5th and 6th October 2021, at the Sheraton Hotel, Abuja and brought together key policymakers, private sector actors, research institutions, women groups, academia, civil society stakeholders as well as international development partners to discuss the implementation plans towards achieving the clean cooking targets of the Paris Agreement. Speaking at the event, the Honourable Minister of State for Environment, Chief Sharon Ikeazor, stated that it is unacceptable that Nigeria should have the greatest number of people dying in Africa as a result of the lack of access to clean cooking. She pledged the Federal Government’s determination to develop a policy framework for clean cooking in the country. According to the minister, “there is already an inter-ministerial committee saddled with the responsibility of developing this policy. Furthermore, a sub-committee of the Inter-ministerial Committee on Climate Change will coordinate national efforts to address the challenges posed by the lack of access to clean cooking”. She declared that the Ministry is committed to integrating the outcomes of the forum in its NDCs implementation efforts and plans. In her goodwill message, the Honourable Minister of Women Affairs, Dame Pauline Tallen OFR, KSG, represented by Mrs. Funke Oladipo, thanked the Federal Ministry of Environment and the Nigerian Alliance for Clean...
NIGERIA CLEAN COOKING FORUM 2021

NIGERIA CLEAN COOKING FORUM 2021

Approximately 127 million people and more than 24 million households cook inefficiently in an open fire. This traditional cooking method is a silent killer. The smoke that emanates from this method of cooking causes 78,000 deaths in Nigeria annually according to the WHO. In fact, Nigeria experiences the highest number of smoke-related deaths in Africa; after Malaria and HIV/AIDS it is the biggest killer. Traditional cooking method is also unnecessarily expensive, costing poor families’ money that could be put to better use on education, health and nutrition. It also causes deforestation and contributes to the effect of climate change. Clean cooking will save lives, empower women, improve livelihood and combat climate change. It is a priority area in energy access that is central in achieving the goals of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) and Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) Initiative. It is estimated that adoption of clean cooking by 30million household can reduce about 60 million1 tons of CO2e. This will result to about 15% of Nigeria’s total emission reduction target. Even though clean cooking has many benefits, the rate of adoption by households and institutions has been very slow. The reasons are many: Inadequate efforts to scale up domestic production of clean cookstoves, insufficient access to finance, inadequate awareness about the benefits of clean fuels and stoves, weak government policies, no legislative framework, poorly developed supply chain among others. The two-day Nigeria Clean Cooking Forum brings together key policymakers, private sector leaders, foundations, research institutions, women groups and civil society stakeholders as well as international partners to discuss the implementation plans towards achieving the clean cooking targets in...